PCT Kennedy Meadows to Walker Pass April 2022

I went on a solo backpacking trek on the Pacific Crest Trail, heading southbound out of Kennedy Meadows and arriving in Walker Pass four days later.  This is one of the driest sections of the PCT, and I hiked it during a dry year, but luckily it was early enough in the season that drinking water was readily available.  The northern section was forested and the southern part was mostly chaparral, but both were beautiful in their own way.

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PCT Golden Spike to Agua Dulce 2022

I did a solo section hike on the Pacific Crest Trail starting at Soledad Mountain Road near the Golden Spike, heading north, passing through picturesque Vasquez Rocks County Park, and ending at the town of Agua Dulce.  This hike was interesting in that I used an eBike to deliver myself to the beginning trailhead, and picked it up afterwards using the car, which saved me a long road walk.

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PCT Fuller Ridge to Whitewater May 2021

I hiked solo on the Pacific Crest Trail from the Fuller Ridge Trailhead in the San Jacinto Wilderness down to Snow Creek, then across the desert, via San Gorgonio Pass, to the Whitewater Preserve near the Whitewater River.  This 28 mile stretch of trail encompassed the remaining pieces of PCT Sections B and C that I hadn’t yet hiked.  It was finally time to get this done!

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PCT Mill Creek to the Golden Spike April 2021

Vicki and I backpacked (mainly) on the Pacific Crest Trail from Mill Creek Summit in the Angeles National Forest to the Golden Spike in Soledad Canyon, near Acton.  Along the way we climbed Mount Gleason and visited the Station Fire Memorial.  We also checked out the “Golden Spike” monument, where the PCT was formally completed and dedicated as a National Scenic Trail back in 1993.  The weather started out hot, but a cold front came through and produced plenty of chilly damp clouds for the second half of the hike.  As always, the PCT delivered plenty of views and lots of ups and downs.

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PCT Hesperia to I-15 April 2021

Vicki and I backpacked on the Pacific Crest Trail from the Mojave Dam in Hesperia to Interstate 15 near Cajon Pass, visiting Silverwood Lake along the way.  We’re fairly wimpy hikers, so it took us four days to hike 29 miles!  Why did we do it?  Because this was just about the final piece of PCT Section C that we had left to hike.  The weather was a bit warm, but we had a good time, and got the 2021 hiking season off to a fun start.

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PCT Cloudburst Summit to Mill Creek May 2020

We section-hiked the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) in the Angeles National Forest from Cloudburst Summit at mile 398 to the Mill Creek Fire Station at mile 419 over the course of three days. This hike happened during the time of the Covid-19 pandemic, and we decided to “Social Distance” ourselves as much as possible by hiking all alone in the middle of nowhere.

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PCT Onyx Summit to Whitewater April 2017

As Pacific Crest Trail “Section Hikers” we differ from the true “PCT Through-Hiker” in that we can hike the trail in any order and in any direction that we please.  This is the kind of freedom we like.  Our previous two hikes in California Section C were both Northbound, but this hike was planned from the outset to be Southbound. Why?  Because we did our homework and  checked the elevation profile of the trail.  We made darn sure that we started at a significantly higher point than the finish!  As we stated to the other hikers that we met along the way (all of them sweating and puffing up the trail):  “We take our PCT hikes downhill – both ways!”

And this section was truly a whopper of a downhill, with over 6500 feet between the highest and lowest points.  Being the ever-changing PCT, there was also more than 3000 feet of uphill climbing here and there along the way, which yielded a total descent of 9500 feet!  This was nearly two miles of elevation loss!  And it would have been a true knee-destroyer if it weren’t for the fact that it spread the change out over a total of more than 35 miles.  True, some sections were steeper than others, but all in all, the PCT is known for being a well-graded trail.  Just the same, we sure were glad to be hiking southbound this time!

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